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Genre: Drum and Bass

© 2012. License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike
So basically I dug up a really old, unfinished track, ruined it, finished it, and posted it. I'd like to think it turned out pretty damn well.

Stream: 128 kbps, 44 kHz (joint stereo)
Download: 320.0 kbps, 44 kHz (joint stereo), 7.53 MB
Playing time (m:ss): 3:17
Date uploaded: May 23, 2012, 03:23 EDT Show more info
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I like it! How did you make the piano track? Performance, piano roll or sample? I esp. like the drum beat. -showie
 May 23, 2012, 14:05 EDT
Omitted 2 posts.
Spyduck 
As far as samples go, I'm not sure. Quite a few of the synths that Reason uses use patches. Patches are essentially preset envelope, wave type, modulation values, etc. that apply to that specific device in reason. Some of the devices, however, use .wav files for main sample, like the redrum device for example. This is where google is your friend since most DAW's that use a piano roll can do things with .wav samples. The sounds that I use are in the factory sound bank of reason, so they just kind of come with the program. Other DAW's will usually also have their own samples plugged right in. I don't really know of any banks with free samples, however. Though, there's always recording your own if you've got the equipment and the instrument.
flag (May 25, 2012, 03:50 EDT)
Rex Yehudi (shoham) 
OK. Thanks, that's a good point. I guess playing with around with sine waves can work too? -sho
flag (May 25, 2012, 07:32 EDT)
Spyduck 
Definitely. If you can find good samples of sine, square, triangle, sawtooth, and noise waves, there's a hell of a lot you can do. Just check out some chiptunes by people like Sabrepulse or Colon Openbracket for proof of that.
flag (May 27, 2012, 01:01 EDT)
Rex Yehudi (shoham) 
Cool, thanks for the encouragement. Anything in particular (effects-wise) that I should look at doing to the waves. I noticed that fading in and fading out on a sine makes it sound like a steel drum or glass harmonica -- any other tricks you can think of? Would be very helpful! Thanks.
flag (May 27, 2012, 09:51 EDT)